Talking to you…Nothing is, as it seems 11/13/19

So, to those of you who have been following along with my Nothing parts 1-5, I have one more verse I’d like to add to finalize the poem.

However…I have a favor to ask of each of you first.

My daughter drew a sketch (a few months back) that holds the exact feeling visually I am trying to portray with my words. She does not like this drawing, and feels it doesn’t represent the emotion she was trying to convey. I have asked her if I could use it, and she has declined. I am respecting her wishes, but I think there is something bigger to learn here.

My hopes in posting this, is for you to take a few minutes and say a supportive word or two to a young budding artist that might help her see the beauty in her creation in whatever form it ends up taking. Maybe you have a personal experience you’d like to share?

Personally, many of my poems start off in one direction, to find they’ve completely morphed into something different by the end. I happen to love that about art, it’s my favorite part.

I will post the poem in its entirety, with or without the sketch tomorrow. And, I will let her read any comments you choose to share.

With much love, thank you so very much.

15 thoughts on “Talking to you…Nothing is, as it seems 11/13/19

  1. I cannot convince anyone of the value of one’s own capacity with respect to art, drawing, but I think I could just tell her that it is not a problem if she exposes what she has tried to do. For her it might not have any connection with what you intend to transmit with your writing, but you know, sometimes it is the self that blocks out the skills. The dissociation between intention and result is too strong in drawing. It is a fact. But mostly because our expectations are either way too high or we need to really appreciate our style in order to let it be seen. But life is trying and growing precisely to overcome this block out. Pride should be put aside in trying and growing. I would tell her then —and sorry for taking so long to say this— that drawing is part of a self, an interpretation, and it need not anticipate a result. Whatever came out of her mind to accompany your piece of writing is surely good, because it was inspired, and it was hers. On the other hand, it is vital that, if not now, at some point she dares to show what she does, no matter how imperfect or not quite the expected outcome it turns to be for her. I would tell her to enjoy. I’d really like to see it. Wish you the best.

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      1. Now I’d like to share some private thing with you, her, which I don’t normally do, but this is a good time for it. Here it goes: my mom was my most fervent admirer. She was the one who would always stand there for, in anything, but I now refer to my attempts to draw and paint. I would be, and I was until not so recently my most terrible critic, and would even get angry with myself or her (more with myself) when I could not reach a result (there’s always a longer story of one’s character and so on), but she, my mom, would let me cool down and do, and most times I continued trying, until I grew on a bit and I began to impose my own criticism upon me, others’ and self-consciousness, insecurity, call it whatever. Anyhow, I did not listen my mom enough in this respect. Why? Because she was “my mom”. I thought before “oh, well, this is comfortable, to have someone backing my things up, but it’s not real, because it’s my mom. What else would a mother say. She’s says nice things to you because she loves you”. Terrible mistake. Foremost, my mom was my mom, yes, but she had also an excellent judgment about art and she could tell particularity where others could not in art, painting, but most of all, she was a very qualified individual, as much as any other. Why shouldn’t I consider her views, her encouragement? She could see through me and gave me what I needed when I needed it most, at the beginning of it all, which was a push towards the appreciation of myself in what I was trying to achieve. Hope my sharing this experience can help somehow. For me it was the opportunity to cry out a little of what I had hidden in my soul for a long time since my childhood. It felt nice. Best wishes for the both of you.

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      2. I cannot thank you enough for sharing this with both of us. What a heavy thing to carry for so long, I am glad it felt good to let it out. Thank you for trusting us with these tender feelings. I am lucky enough to have experienced, from both sides, the mother and the child. All I can say is that mother’s love their children no matter what. I think it is very normal to experience the feelings and thoughts you experienced with your mother, I definitely have too. I now know, being a mother, this is normal and I’m sure your mother did too. And I bet it only made her want to love/support you more. Hugs to you!

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      3. I’m a mother of two already big boys (big young men), and that also helped me understand lots of things, perhaps one of the greatest reasons to understand. Thank you for bringing me the opportunity to share. I’m not really into commenting. But I could not miss this one. Thank you again. My big hug to you, too.

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  2. I think many artists struggle with doubting their ability to create art but it’s part of the process to find your own voice/style. All art is an expression and there are no wrong answers, because it comes from your unique perspective on life. Keep creating art only because you love it, and let “mistakes” become a new experiments. I loved art/drawing/ writing when I was growing up, but my parents discouraged it, they thought artists were doomed to poverty. But if you love art, you’re meant to create it. The more you practice, the better your artwork will become. Good luck to you❤️.

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